Wednesday, July 8, 2009

The Budondo Clinic in Jinja

So since most of you have asked what it was like at the clinic and what we were actually doing I thought I would show you these pictures first.

I want to preface that we tried hard to actually not take that many pictures. Mostly because if I was going to see a doctor - I wouldnt want someone taking pictures of me. Especially with this huge fat camera. I wanted to be sensitive to that and I realized we were there to work so these are just some of the ones I was able to get.

So our entire team that went on the trip was divided into 3 groups: The Medical Team, The Outreach Team, and the Orphanage Team. Freeland & I were both on the medical team. There were 6 of us total on the Medical Team. This year has been hard so there were less of us on the team than they normally have. But we still made it & were able to see about 250-300 people a day. (with only 1 doctor (freeland), 3 nurses, & 2 non medical people -like me- insane!)

So every morning at 8:00 we loaded up the bus with all our equipment and then stopped to pick up our translators. Then we headed straight to the clinic to start right away.

Medical Clinic in Uganda

Medical Clinic in Uganda

This is the Budondo Heath Center where we set up our clinic while we were in Jinja.

Uganda Medical Clinic


Uganda Medical Clinic
This is what the "waiting room" looked like before anyone in the village knew we were there

Medical Clinic in Uganda
This is the room Freeland saw patients in

Medical Clinic in Uganda
This is where we kept all the medicine

Medical Clinic in Uganda
more medicine

So thats basically what the clinic looked like.

The first morning we got there at 8:30 and there were already over 100 people there waiting. It was crazy what those first 30 minutes felt like. Knowing that within the next hour more people would show up than we were going to probably be able to see that day. Its heart breaking knowing we are going to have to tell them we cant see them.

We handed out number so that we could try to get people in as quick as possible and there wouldnt be any fighting over who was waiting first (because there was already fighting even with the numbers) Once we got everyone seated (thanks to our translators) here is what it looked like:

Medical Clinic in Uganda

these are the people who were waiting inside to be seen

Medical Clinic in Uganda

Medical Clinic in Uganda
and here are SOME of the people who were waiting outside to be seen.

and that was just the first day. Every day we showed up there were more & more people there waiting. It was very overwhelming and heart breaking to see.

Here are some more pictures from around the clinic:

Medical Clinic in Uganda

Medical Clinic in Uganda

Uganda Medical Clinic

Medical Clinic in Uganda

Uganda Medical Clinic

Medical Clinic in Uganda

Medical Clinic in Uganda

Medical Clinic in Uganda

Of course there are 1000 more pictures .. and lots of Freeland actually with patients which just makes my heart leap out of my chest .. Im hoping to put those all together and post them at once. I just wanted to show you what the actual clinic was like first so you could get an idea of where we were and what we were doing while we were in Jinja (the first part of the trip)

As I already said - it was incredibly emotional and overwhelming to see patient after patient come in with so many things wrong. I was amazed to see the little things I take for granted like wearing glasses so I can actually see or even just being able to take advil when I have a headache. Its especially hard when babies would come in. (Most of them without even diapers on.. which we learned the hard way) but they would have fevers over 103.. and their parents would say its been that way for a long time. Its sad seeing that so many things could be treated easily if they just had the means to do it. I cant count how many people all had Malaria thats never been properly treated. TB, Aids, and STD's were also common. And it wasnt rare to see children who had been neglected also. Once Freeland is home I will have to have him share his experience working with every patient and hearing their story.

I think the thing I quickly learned is that anyone can help. Obviously Freeland's role was clearly defined.. and he was able to do so much with barely any experience too. So I questioned/struggled with what I was going to be able to do or how I would help when I had really nothing to offer medically. But after being there just 1 day I was able to see that even with no medical experience or knowledge there is still so much that you can do that helps. (I helped with intake, organizing the people who were waiting to be seen, praying with people, and loving on them while they waited or after they had been seen) and of course there were also all the things the other teams were doing too (more on that later)

Still in the end the hardest part was having to leave everyday knowing there was so much more you could do to help if you just had time. You leave hoping that what you have done was enough and just having to trust that it was.. and that you did all you were supposed to.

Now Im just praying that we get the opportunity to go back!

Okay .. more pictures soon..

5 comments:

  1. You guys are amazing... Proud to know you

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  2. What an an amazing experience! Thank you for sharing. I can't to hear more about the trip.

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  3. what a touching event!! you are so right that we take so many things for granted! and so great to see people like you in this world!

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  4. Wow. I'm so glad you're sharing this - I love seeing pictures and hearing about it. It just makes me so anxious to go!
    Justin and I have been wanting to do something like this too but not sure how it would work logistically with kiddos. Hmm.
    Anyways, look forward to the rest of the stories and pics. Glad you get your hubby back soon. It's rough being apart!

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  5. it sounds & looks like yall had a great experience/trip! love the pics-i love all the bold & beautiful colors the Africans wear! i can't imagine all the things you saw doing the medical stuff! glad you made it back safe & sound! thanks for sharing!

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